Chef’s Night Recipe: Beef Burgundy

[When Bob isn't wandering the markets in search of new products and exotic produce, he's back in the kitchen cooking.] It's winter and that means it's time for braising and pot roasting. This recipe works fine by either method, or a combination of the two. The most important thing this dish needs is time - so plan ahead to give it plenty. It only gets better the longer it cooks. We prepared this as one of the Winter Comfort Foods for a recent Chef's Night menu and it's been featured in a photo gallery by The Hungry Dude's Joe Hakim, a Photo Gallery on the Rogue Estate Facebook and an article in Real Detroit Weekly. Enjoy! Beef Burgundy to serve a table of 4 This is a very flexible and forgiving dish that is perfect for the beginner. Ingredients are inexpensive and short of full out neglect,  it's tough to actually mess up. Like most soups; leftovers taste even better the following day. The software: 3lbs Beef Short Ribs or Flatiron Steaks, roughly chopped 2 Tablespoons peanut oil, vegetable shortening or bacon fat 2 cups diced yellow onion 2 tablespoons crushed garlic (more if desired) 3 cups diced carrot 1 cup finely diced celery 2 cups full bodied red wine - I used Chateau de la Taille Bordeaux 2 cups beef stock 2 tablespoons butter juice of 1/2 lemon 1 star anise Salt Black Pepper 3 hours of time from prep to serve The hardware: A Large (12"+) pan or dutch oven, preferably cast iron. Large (2+ Qt) saucepan optional. The Method: Prep all ingredients before starting - this will make things go much smoother during assembly and cooking. For the wine - use something you'll enjoy drinking, since there will likely be some leftover. If it tastes good in a glass, it'll taste good in a recipe. When chopping beef & veg, smaller pieces mean less cook time. This recipe was timed with beef cut to roughly 1 1/2" cubes. 1/4" dice on the onions and 1/4" slice on the carrots & celery. With everything cleaned, sliced, diced and ready, add the oil or fat to the pan and heat it on med-hi until nearly wisps of smoke appear. Salt the beef and add to the pan carefully (It will spit a little). Don't over crowd the pan - brown in batches. Brown on all sides. When a good color & crust is on the beef, remove to a bowl. A good set of tongs is the best tool for this job. Reduce the heat to medium and add the onions and garlic. Cook the onions and garlic down until they're translucent. Crank the heat up to high and add the wine to the pan to deglaze. Use the tongs or a spatula to scrape all the stuff off the bottom of the pan and mix it around with the onions and wine. As the Wine begins to bubble, reduce the heat to medium-low. (If using a sauce pan, transfer everything over to it at this time.) Return the beef to the pan, add the carrots, celery, beef stock and star anise. Give everything a stir and let it simmer for at least 2 hours. Reduce the heat as needed. Things should be bubbly but NOT boiling. Time is your most important ingredient here. Don't fuss over the pan. Check every 30 minutes, give it a stir, add beef stock and/or wine as needed to keep everything 1/2 submerged. As the beef and carrots become tender enough to mash with a fork around the 90 minute mark, allow liquid to reduce and thicken. After 2 hours, everything should be tender and the liquid should be thick, similar to gravy. If not, cook a little longer. Fish out the star anise, add the butter and lemon juice, stirring everything to combine. Taste the liquid and add salt & pepper as desired, serve immediately. Not surprisingly, this dish will pair perfectly with the wine you used to cook with. Goes great with some fresh, hot bread of any type on the side for scooping, or even just as a carrier for butter. ;) We look forward to your questions and success stories in the comments below or on our Facebook! -///    
A consummate nerd, yet still plays well with others.

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