Burnt Oranges for a Traditional Irish Meal

Editor's Note: Megan is Rogue Estate's newest cake slinger. Despite us dirtying nearly every pot, pan and dish in her kitchen this week she didn't kick us out, so you can expect to see more articles from her in the near future.   This dish was part of The Rogue Estate's Authentic Irish cuisine dinner, featured in Real Detroit Weekly and The Hungry Dudes on 03/14/12. When thinking of Irish food, like any other American, I automatically think of boiled meat, corned beef, and potatoes.  The Irish are not known for their desserts, so when looking them up, I had to keep my mind open, and avoid the Bailey's Cheesecake that you find on "Irish Pubs" all across America.  Turns out the Irish have gotten very creative in using what they could get to make unique desserts. For our Traditional Irish Meal, I decided to tackle this recipe for Burnt Oranges.  Wait...how did tropical oranges become a staple for not-so-tropical Ireland?  Turns out that while Ireland was at war with England, they made friends with Spain.  The Spanish sailed some of its foodstuffs up to Ireland, and the rest was history.  Of course, by the time the oranges were sailed north, and the common folk got their hands on them and ate all of the really ripe ones, they were left with some oranges that had seen better days.  Cooking them like this was an interesting and tasty way to not waste those older oranges.
Burnt Oranges for a Traditional Irish Meal
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Recipe Type: Dessert
Prep time: 1 hour
Cook time: 25 mins
Total time: 1 hour 25 mins
Serves: 6-8
Ingredients
  • 8 Seville Oranges
  • 2/3 cup Very Sweet White Wine
  • 1/2 cup Butter
  • 12 tbsp. Sugar, split in half
  • 1 1/3 cups Fresh Squeezed Orange Juice
  • 3 tbsp. Warmed Irish Whiskey
  • Lyles Golden Syrup for Drizzling
Instructions
  1. Heat oven to 400 Fahrenheit.
  2. Carefully zest all of the oranges into a bowl. Top with sweet white wine, and let sit.
  3. Peel all oranges, being sure to remove as much of the white pith as possible. Break oranges into segments, and remove all seeds. Seville oranges have a LOT of seeds, so try to preserve as much of the juice you lose while seeding them. Lay the orange segments into the bottom of a wide round pan, no more than 2-3 segments deep, and sprinkle with 6 tbsp. of sugar. You will want to use a pan that is broiler and stove-top safe - a saute pan works great. Place in oven for 12 minutes.
  4. Pour orange juice and 6 tbsp. of sugar into a wide saucepan on stove. Simmer down until it becomes a syrup, then stir in the wine & zest mixture. Continue simmering until it thickens back up again.
  5. After 12 minutes, check the orange segments in the oven. If they are not golden brown on top, kick on the broiler, and keep a close eye for a couple of minutes. You want the oranges and sugar to take on a nice caramel colour, but not char. Once they reach that colour, pull from the oven and set on a burner.
  6. Pour the whiskey over the top of the orange segments, let sit about 30 seconds, then flame. Let the flames burn about 30 seconds, then douse with orange juice mixture. Simmer together for 2 minutes, then serve!
  7. This can be served hot, or chilled and topped with whipped cream
Notes
Seville oranges are extremely bitter, so if you are looking for a dessert that is a bit sweeter, you will want to add more sugar (probably double!) or use a table orange. We also tried one other batch with blood oranges that came out much closer to an American's preferred level of sweetness, and the colour came out very pretty to boot. We also thought these would be excellent served on top of vanilla ice cream.
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2.2.1
  What I did leave out of this recipe was that the Seville oranges are a pain in the butt to peel, far more so than any other orange I have ever dealt with.  Between the segments that wouldn't come apart gracefully, to the fact that Seville oranges have more seed than flesh in each segment, I figure next time I'll stick to making this with another type of orange.  The results will be sweeter and less traditional, but I'll swear less. Have any tips on how to handle Seville oranges or a favorite citrus recipe? Let me know in the comments! -Megan

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