Chef’s Night

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Where good food meets poor taste.

 

Chef’s Night: Le Lundi Gras!

[Rogue Estate Chef's Nights are a weekly dinner club for Rogue Estate residents and guests to get together to prepare and enjoy new menus, share, learn, teach and be inspired. Each week is hosted and led by a different person, giving everyone an opportunity to sharpen their knives and their skills.]   This week Ian and Jack led us down to New Orleans to celebrate Mardi Gras via Jack's kitchen. Everyone cooked their asses off using some great ingredients and the meal was absolutely tremendous from spicy start to sweet finish. Ian and Jack's Mardi Gras Menu: Apps: Fridge pickled okra: pickled raw to keep that awesome okra snap with a bit of heat from red peppers.  - Ian Blue Points Oysters on the half shell with a smoked chili flake mignonette. - Jack Main: Creole Mustard Slaw: Cabbage, Bell Peppers, Onions, Celery and Herbs in a Mustard, Mayo & spices dressing - Bob Snow Crab Claws: steam-poached and served with mustard, caper, mayo, hot sauce and oknomiyaki Remoulade. - Jack & Ian Shrimp & Duck Etouffee: Butter Roux, Trinity (Celery, Bell Pepper, Onion), Shrimp & Duck Confit in Shrimp Stock.   - Ian Red beans & Rice: Red Beans, Tasso Ham & Chaurice over Popcorn Rice - Ian Dessert: Creamy Pralines, Roasted Pecans candied in cream, butter, brown sugar and palm sugar. - Bob Beignets, deep fried then dusted with powdered sugar, cinnamon and sugar and the killer: 5 spice powder & sugar. - Jason & Megan Cocktails & Pairings: Sazerac,  A New Orleans staple of Rye Whiskey, Bitters, Pernod (in place of Herbsaint) and Lemon Zest. - Bob Brandy Milk Punch, a sweeter drink of Milk, Brandy, Simple Syrup and Nutmeg. - Bob A selection of Abita beers, including Pale Ale, Lager & Stout. - Jack   Recipes from this Chef's Night to be posted soon. Want more Food Porn photos from this and other Rogue Estate Chef's Nights? Hit us up on Facebook!  
A consummate nerd, yet still plays well with others.

Rogue Estate Chef’s Night – Pantry Raid

[Rogue Estate Chef's Nights are a weekly dinner club for Rogue Estate residents and guests to get together to prepare and enjoy new menus, share, learn, teach and be inspired. Each week is hosted and led by a different person, giving everyone an opportunity to sharpen their knives and their skills.] This week for Chef's Night I hosted one of our recurring themes we call "Pantry Raid" - an excuse to use up various odds and ends that may be kicking around in dark corners, rediscover items of interest from previous recipes and of course meet the challenge of pairing a few good bottles of beer and wine to fit the flavors on the plate. We also had an added bonus of welcoming some new members this month as we expand the estate - the Tag Team of Megan and Jason joined Jack, Ian and myself in the kitchen and Frank did a Drive-by during the evening. Our menu was decidedly pork-centric, with a side of lake fish and a few vegetarian adaptations to meet Jason's obnoxious dietary needs. We started the evening snacking on water crackers and Slow Jams jam, along with a treat of Iberico Ham provided by Megan. Jack's App was up first - a Japanese rice & green tea dish with lots of condiments called Ochazuke, in which one of the condiments was a heavily camouflaged sinus clearing, eye searing blob of wasabi. Jack is a bastard. Thankfully, the dish was paired with Sake and beer, so we all managed to pull through OK. Next up - Ian presented a German inspired soup of pork, white beans, sauerkraut and carrots which was immediately dubbed "Fart Soup". He also came up with a veggie version for Jason which substituted additional fart in place of the pork. Despite the gravity of the ingredients, the broth remained light and clear and the dish didn't weigh too heavily on our bellies. My turn for the main:  a modified Filipino Pork Adobo starting with the basic preparation and adding some flavor punches and green veg at the end to mouthwatering results. And yes, I even came up with a veggie version for Jason involving carrots, jicima and beets. The beets turned it all red, but the textures and flavor were worth the christmas theme. Recipe for the Pork Adobo at the end of this article. Dessert - a rare treat at the estate since Rok went full time with her Cake and Rock Star business - Megan and Jason produced a pair of chocolate souffle cakes from scratch over the course of our dinner preparations - one topped with strawberry jam and whipped cream, the other with espresso whipped cream. I added my two cents to the sweets with an impromptu congee made from the first batch of rice that was way over cooked mixed to a pudding with a can of coconut milk and sweetened condensed milk and a handful of dried berries. As usual, nobody left even slightly hungry.     Rogue Estate Pantry Raid Pork Adobo
  • 2 tblsp oil or lard
  • 2 lbs Pork loin, chops or shoulder, roughly chopped
  • 1 cup diced onion
  • 2 cups cider vinegar
  • 2 cups water
  • 1/2 cup Soy sauce
  • 2 tblsp fish sauce
  • 6 bay leaves
  • 2 tsp black pepper
  • 1 tsp tumeric powder
  • 1/2 lb frozen peas
  • 1 cup zucchini, roughly chopped
  • 1/4 cup flat parsley, finely minced
  • 2 cups of cooked rice for serving
  • option: 1 tsp cornstarch + 1/2 c water
Rice cook time will vary, so use the instructions on the package to determine when to start cooking your rice so that it's ready to serve when the adobo is done after a 90 minute cook time. Season chopped pork with salt. In a 6 qt sauce pot, heat oil or lard on medium-high heat, add pork in batches until browned. push off to the sides and add the onion in to saute until just taking on color. Turn the heat back up to add vinegar, water, soy, fish sauce, bay leaves, black pepper and turmeric. stir to combine and un-stick anything from the bottom of the pot since this is essentially a de-glaze. As the liquid comes to just a boil, reduce the heat to maintain a good tremor without a full on boil. Cover and let it cook for an hour. Check occasionally to give everything a stir and adjust the heat as needed to keep everything below boil. After an hour, remove the lid and add the zucchini, stir and adjust the heat as needed to keep a merry tremor in the pot. After 15 minutes the liquids should be reduced and beginning to thicken. If you'd like a thicker gravy, whisk 1 tsp of cornstarch and 1/2 cup of warm water together, then stir that slurry into the adobo. continue stirring, add the frozen peas and remove from heat. Portion rice into bowls, spoon the pork, zucchini and peas over it and the gravy over that, then garnish with parsley and serve immediately. Hop on over and LIKE The Rogue Estate on Facebook to check out the full food porn gallery for this week's Chef's Night, as well as previous Chef's Night galleries.  -///  
A consummate nerd, yet still plays well with others.

Chef’s Night Recipe: Shrimp Au Gratin

Shrimp and cheese? You bet. The cheese in this is an amazing mild Dutch ("Dorothea Potato Chip Goat cheese") that incorporates potato, onion and herbs into the finished product. We found it at Westborn Market in Berkley, and it's worth searching for. We prepared this as one of the Winter Comfort Foods for a recent Chef's Night menu and it's been featured in a photo gallery by The Hungry Dude's Joe Hakim, a Photo Gallery on the Rogue Estate Facebook and an article in Real Detroit Weekly. Enjoy! Shrimp Gratin Appetizer (Yields 4 small 4 oz. ramekins) 2 tbsp flour 2 tbsp butter 1.5 - 2 cups half & half, heated 6 oz. grated Dorothea Potato Chip Goat cheese 24 (31-45 count) raw shrimp peeled and deveined, thawed, tails removed 3 scallions finely sliced 2 cloves garlic minced dash white pepper dash nutmeg dash salt 2-3 oz. grated Raclette cheese 1/4 cup Panko breadcrumbs 1.5 tbsp Virgin Olive Oil pinch paprika pinch dried thyme pinch of salt Flat-leaf parsley (for garnish) 1) Make Mornay (cheese sauce) Combine flour and butter over medium heat, simmer while stirring until raw flour smell goes away (10 minutes). Add 1.5 cups half & half and stir until thickened, lower heat (if too thick, add more half & half). Add grated Goat cheese, stir to combine. 2) Assemble Add shrimp to cheese sauce, and simmer on lowest heat for only 1-2 minutes. Spoon into mixing bowl; add scallions, garlic, pepper, nutmeg and salt to taste, stir. Spoon gratin into into 4 small ramekins, making sure each contains 6 shrimp. Make crumb topping: stir together Panko, oil, paprika, thyme, and salt. Top each ramekin with 1/4 of the Raclette and crumb topping. 3) Bake Bake ramekins at 350°F for 10 minutes until golden on top. Remove, let cool slightly, garnish with parsley. Pairs very well with a chilled Alsatian or Oregon Pinot Gris.

Chef’s Night Recipe: Beef Burgundy

[When Bob isn't wandering the markets in search of new products and exotic produce, he's back in the kitchen cooking.] It's winter and that means it's time for braising and pot roasting. This recipe works fine by either method, or a combination of the two. The most important thing this dish needs is time - so plan ahead to give it plenty. It only gets better the longer it cooks. We prepared this as one of the Winter Comfort Foods for a recent Chef's Night menu and it's been featured in a photo gallery by The Hungry Dude's Joe Hakim, a Photo Gallery on the Rogue Estate Facebook and an article in Real Detroit Weekly. Enjoy! Beef Burgundy to serve a table of 4 This is a very flexible and forgiving dish that is perfect for the beginner. Ingredients are inexpensive and short of full out neglect,  it's tough to actually mess up. Like most soups; leftovers taste even better the following day. The software: 3lbs Beef Short Ribs or Flatiron Steaks, roughly chopped 2 Tablespoons peanut oil, vegetable shortening or bacon fat 2 cups diced yellow onion 2 tablespoons crushed garlic (more if desired) 3 cups diced carrot 1 cup finely diced celery 2 cups full bodied red wine - I used Chateau de la Taille Bordeaux 2 cups beef stock 2 tablespoons butter juice of 1/2 lemon 1 star anise Salt Black Pepper 3 hours of time from prep to serve The hardware: A Large (12"+) pan or dutch oven, preferably cast iron. Large (2+ Qt) saucepan optional. The Method: Prep all ingredients before starting - this will make things go much smoother during assembly and cooking. For the wine - use something you'll enjoy drinking, since there will likely be some leftover. If it tastes good in a glass, it'll taste good in a recipe. When chopping beef & veg, smaller pieces mean less cook time. This recipe was timed with beef cut to roughly 1 1/2" cubes. 1/4" dice on the onions and 1/4" slice on the carrots & celery. With everything cleaned, sliced, diced and ready, add the oil or fat to the pan and heat it on med-hi until nearly wisps of smoke appear. Salt the beef and add to the pan carefully (It will spit a little). Don't over crowd the pan - brown in batches. Brown on all sides. When a good color & crust is on the beef, remove to a bowl. A good set of tongs is the best tool for this job. Reduce the heat to medium and add the onions and garlic. Cook the onions and garlic down until they're translucent. Crank the heat up to high and add the wine to the pan to deglaze. Use the tongs or a spatula to scrape all the stuff off the bottom of the pan and mix it around with the onions and wine. As the Wine begins to bubble, reduce the heat to medium-low. (If using a sauce pan, transfer everything over to it at this time.) Return the beef to the pan, add the carrots, celery, beef stock and star anise. Give everything a stir and let it simmer for at least 2 hours. Reduce the heat as needed. Things should be bubbly but NOT boiling. Time is your most important ingredient here. Don't fuss over the pan. Check every 30 minutes, give it a stir, add beef stock and/or wine as needed to keep everything 1/2 submerged. As the beef and carrots become tender enough to mash with a fork around the 90 minute mark, allow liquid to reduce and thicken. After 2 hours, everything should be tender and the liquid should be thick, similar to gravy. If not, cook a little longer. Fish out the star anise, add the butter and lemon juice, stirring everything to combine. Taste the liquid and add salt & pepper as desired, serve immediately. Not surprisingly, this dish will pair perfectly with the wine you used to cook with. Goes great with some fresh, hot bread of any type on the side for scooping, or even just as a carrier for butter. ;) We look forward to your questions and success stories in the comments below or on our Facebook! -///    
A consummate nerd, yet still plays well with others.